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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
and say we'll have to do a surcharge on every bill which does happen in san francisco. >> very, very different issue. every bill has a nice surcharge on it you would have had a similar back lash. why are you trying to charge me more? >> they are not paid to be eloquent. they're paid to do the work and sometimes it doesn't come across as well but they were talking about the bottom line. i thought they were witn their rights and don't you. >> they are within their rights, but is it the wise thing to do? if you are the sole owner and pren pren and shareholder, go for and talk about how 28 hours is the new 40 and as they cut the hours back so they don't expe people to incread health care costs. but if you are a ceo and other shareholders own 98 percent. >> and john, wha dbout that? they are publi corporations and not private companies that they a in charge of. is that a problem. a public corporation ceo sayinghis. >> i think it is it. whether republican or democratic or whatever your ideology. it is it acknowledged that rules and regulations are costs and imposed on business. they are i
perfection, they need you. >>> nothing private anymore. san francisco the latest city putting eavesdropping devices on public buses. department homeland security dishing out $6 million to the city by the bay so it can listen into the passengers and more towns are planning to do the same thing. and john hates the idea. why? >> its horrifying blast to the iron curtain world of the past where brutal governments snoop on people. we're not subjects of the federal government. they work for us. the idea they become angels so they can look over us is really scary thing. >> it's the worst of the past. big brother era and worst of the future with high technology. what do you think? >> please. come on. a lot of crime happens on buses. i think it's a great idea we have cameras in there. it's not like someone sitting in a dark room every camera in every bus. we're going to use the footage and from a crime prevention point of view. >> what do you think good idea or bad idea? >> this is big brother on steroids. what is next, going to put video cameras in bedroom inside the house. this is just bad stuff. i
of the money? how do i know would goes to those people? will lie get paid ba? the founder joined us from san francisco. had rino which cannot get scammed? >> we spend our me making sure the loans on the website are legitimate. we do it through three methods. we find local field partners to make sure their legitimate organizations they are the business plans of the men and women. a farmer inhe philippines trying to buy a cow for a dairy business they getn the website from the local field partner. then there audited to make sure it is true. if not, then we shut them down. as you get to repaid you know, the business has earned enough money to pay you back. then you can withdraw the money back or landed to another entreprenuership. john: looking at the distance i would assume most do not get paid back? >> over the last seven years repayment is an 98%? that is hard to believe. why? >> the poorest people on the planet, a 2.5 billion the wonders served by the banks don't have collateral or credit scores. but they have friends and neighbors and self select and to a group of women, over 80 percent g
of your privacy? >>> nothing private anymore. san francisco the latest city putting eavesdropping devices on public buses. department homeland security dishing out $6 million to the city by the bay so it can listen into the passengers and more towns are planning to do the same thing. and john hates the idea. why? >> its horrifying blast to the iron curtain world of the past where brutal governments snoop on people. we're not subjects of the federal government. they work for us. the idea they become angels so they can look over us is really scary thing. >> it's the worst of the past. big brother era and worst of the future with high technology. what do you think? >> please. come on. a lot of crime happens on buses. i think it's a great idea we have cameras in there. it's not like someone sitting in a dark room every camera in every bus. we're going to use the footage and from a crime prevention point of view. >> what do you think good idea or bad idea? >> this is big brother on steroids. what is next, going to put video cameras in bedroom inside the house. this is just bad stuff. it's one
. gerri: let's look at the markets to watch in 2013. where you see big growth, san francisco on it, a market that always seems to do well. what other towns and cities should we look at? >> there are some markets that have strong fundamentals. strong job growth, low vacancy rates and a very strong foreclosure inventory, or very small inventory of homes still to come onto the market. san francisco, several metros in texas, louisville, places that haven't gotten as much attention with the price increases that have had strong market fundamentals all along or the markets to watch next year. gerri: fort worth, austin, houston, san antonio and nebraska, omaha, louisville, peabody, maryland, interesting. she had run some numbers on that. it'll be interesting to see what those numbers too. thank you for coming on, great to have both of you here. now we want to know what you think. do you feel the housing market is recovering where you live? vote on the right-hand side of the screen and we will share the results at the end of the show. stay with us. gerri: breaking news in the fiscal cliff t
meters are going up. san francisco has the second highest rate. 5.5 bucks an hour, followed by new york and los angeles at five bucks. never complain again when you're filling up the meter. david: unbelievable. it is time for melissa francis and money. >> i'm adam shapiro in for melissa francis. here's what's "money" tonight. brace for impact. senate majority leader harry reid says it looks like we'll head over the fiscal cliff. with just four days until the deadline can president obama and congress still pull out a deal in the nick of time? senator john hoeven of north dakota joins us to respond. >>> plus, a game-changer for the insurance industry. an auto insurer unveils new policies that charge by the mile, giving a big potential boon to drivers. can it drive the competition off the road? the ceo of metro mile is here to take the wheel. >>> and big beer companies putting beer goggles on their customers. the market for kraft beer is booming and big labels are battling to get a foothold but they may be using crafty tactics to sell you the same flat brew in different packaging. less fil
to 2012. here in omaha, nebraska. at the berkshire hathaway meeting. we are live in san francisco. we are watching greece again. mistakes are being raised and time is running out. >> the greek parliament at an emotional session. detaals going on outside. >> facebook has made its debut at. >> the market is having a turtle bay. and facebook is doing relatively well. liz: blockbuster upholding the insurance mandate that health care bill. >> is about access to care. >> the big rally in the markets across the board. a major blowout at the top of citigroup. >> we talked to charlie gasper enough today. the auto bailout proves to be interesting. you believe it was the one that won ohio for the president? >> yes, i believe it was great for the president. i think it hurts the governor. liz: today, the thousandth episode of countdown to the closing bell. >> i'm here to say congratulations. >> watching the show. at the end of the day, sometimes you get a little tired. some people take that five hour energy drink. and i just want you. you just have so much energy. >> here at the london olympics. >
of the money? how do i know would goes to those people? will lie get paid back? the founder joined us from san francisco. had rino which cannot get scammed? >> we spend our time making sure the loans on the website are legitimate. we do it through three methods. we find local field partners to make sure their legitimate organizations they are the business plans of the men and women. a farmer in the philippines trying to buy a cow for a dairy business. they get on the website from the local field partner. then there audited to make sure it is true. if not, then we shut them down. as you get to repaid you know, the business has earned enough money to pay you back. then you can withdraw the money back or landed to another etreprenuership. john: looking at the distance i would assume most do not get paid back? >> over the last seven years repayment is an 98%? that is hard to believe. why? >> the poorest people othe planet, a 2.5 billion the wonders served by the banks don't have collateral or credit scores. but they have friends and neighbors and self selt and to a group of women, over 80 percent
in tattoos. check out the arms of new san francisco 49ers quarterback. now that ink is the source of controversy. here's a quote from a controversial column: stuart: whitley was attacked on the internet over that story. he joins us now from orlando. sir, welcome to the program. you are a controversial guy, aren't you? really stirring it up there, r. whitley. >> that wasn't my intent. i just have always looked at tattoos as sort of an odd thing to put on your body. stuart: i agree with you. i'm 100% with you. i don't like tattoos. don't want my kids to have tattoos. donald trump doesn't like his five or six kids to have tattoos. we're with you. but i want to know why were you called a racist because you made the statement about tattoos on a quarterback? >> well, i think had i do it all over again, i started the column about making a line about san quentin and how the inmates there have tattoos, just to point out that your average tattoo person does not have exactly the best reputation in society. so people associated prison tattoos the whole thing with the quarterback as if i was
: but this is a historic reversal. look i've been in america 40 years and started out in san francisco 40 years ago and back in those days, there was always a net migration into california, significant numbers. california gained tens of millions of people over my time in america, but that just recently has been completely reversed. now there's a net leaving of people. and that's historic in america, that's historic. >> it is historic. it is historic because you come here, as i said for the weather, but that's it anymore and there's no promise of a future. don't promise that you're going to be able to put down your stake and really do something with it. look at the head of facebook, one of the partners left not only the state of california, left the united states of america because of the taxes going on in this state and in the united states of america itself. so, again, there's no incentive to stay in the state because you were so punished, if in fact you do have the state. if you're a young couple trying to raise a family into the public school system and the public school system is in the tank an
change after december 31st. biz buy sell.com group general manager mike handles man joins us from san francisco. thanks for joining us. >> thanks for having me. sandra: could you give me the idea the type of companies we're talking about here? your site lists 45,000 businesses for sale worldwide. what kind of businesses are these? >> we really refer to them as main street businesses. so the majority are made up of retail shops, restaurants, service businesses, smaller manufacturing businesses. most are selling for underra million dollars. sandra: sorry, go ahead. david: who is buying, mike? >> people that are buying are largely, you know, the unemployed workforce. unemployment is still relatively high, about 8%. often in our economy in past recessions when the larger companies can't pick up the slack to increase employment people turn to entrepreneurism and those are people that buy small business. >> give us an idea, small business has been part of the national conversation, a big part of it as we talk about the tax hikes approaching at the end of the year and the fiscal cliff. what
francisco, san jose, phoenix and miami for lauderdale, lee philadelphia failed to report annual gain in cumulative -- and down $6 trillion from the peak in 2006 but we will take weekend that. lori: i was amazed. melissa: when you look at the name that was not just northern california where you see -- was also l a, that was interesting. new york values went up as well. lori: markets are scattered. that is a debate over what the fines wealth in america, cost of living, property values, you can't have one single threshold the works across the board because -- lori: bringing it back to taxes. melissa: i love it. lori: and $8 billion deal, what does it mean for the future of trading? charlie gasparino will be along with exclusive details. melissa: look at how the dollar is fairing, the market up slightly and with that, currencies are weaker across the board. we will be right back. melissa: we want to take you to capitol hill, john boehner. >> the president called on the house again and again to pass a bill to protect 98% of the american people from a tax hike. today we will do better than
growing quick delivery retail segment. joining us from san francisco is tom allason, founder and ceo of shuttle. thanks for being with us. first of all, aren't we getting -- do we really need same-day delivery? why can't i we two days? >> you can wait two days if you want to. our view is sometimes you don't want to. our proposition is just about getting delivery right away. it is letting the consumer get delivery when they wanted which is either right away, within minutes of purchase, are quick as a delivery took us 15 minutes, or one hour window of the shopper's choice, same day or any day and operates 24 hours a day, 365 day as a year and can be offered to the consumer at a comparable price point which often means free. my question would be why wouldn't you want to get your shuttled? dennis: i can walk in a store and buy the product there. it does sound like a compelling pitch. you started this $5 million in funding and is because -- [talking over each other] dennis: they tried to invent their entire network. are you are doing in bidding together a bunch of existing local courier s
expected. you are seeing strength in areas such as san francisco, detroit and phoenix, you are seeing growth there. some experts are saying that the housing recovery we're seeing here is gathering strength. people are starting to believe in the recovery little by little. david: still have a long way to go, though. nicole: right. david: improving a little bit. thank you very much. federal subsidies for wind power are set to expire in a couple of days, december 31st. extending them for one more year would cost 12 billion dollars. this according to the joint committee on taxation, which is a pretty neutral committee. so company, when they went into effect 20 years ago, even the congressman who pushed for them said they should expire, said they should be sunseted and they are nowhere near that happening now. adam: if you believe that the government has a role to help new technology get a foot in the door, then the foot's been in the door for a long time and they keep slamming it on us. david: you bring up a point. the reason why the door keeps getting slammed although the door to the subs
to new orleans. senator dianne feinstein's daughter kathryn at superior court in san francisco, retiring, speculation is rampant she may try to replace her mother in washington. the 55-year-old downplayed the notion in a recent interview that she did say she is open to running for public office. the late senator daniel inouye lying in state on capitol hill. a brief ceremony was held this morning attended by harry reid and others. the rotunda with open to the public at noon but people started to violin, he will lay in state through tomorrow morning. he died monday at the age of 88. that is your west coast minute. dennis: the city of las vegas is on the mend with places like my next guest's casino seeing double-digit booking growth. joining me for this week's on the road is the ceo of the cosmopolitan of las vegas. i got to start with one of the weirdest things about your hotel and that is your tv commercial. they are really different. you have that one where guys are talking and uttering lines from queen. i wonder what kind of audience you are going after with this stuff. >> we set out at
military base in san francisco. in both cases politicians said no. >> congressman representing his district and senator representing his or her state so they want to make sure they are taken care of and that may get in a way of what is best for the nation. >> the federal government is america's biggest landlord, selling 20% of its empty or underperforming buildings would save $2 billion. >> goes through your garage, clear it out and the government is no difference. the scale is a matter of scale. >> the refuse to sell valuable public land adjacent to fast-growing cities and let mining companies take billions in gold and silver for free. without charging royalties like we do for oil and natural gas. selling amtrak could net $60 billion. two taxpayer and utilities, tennessee valley authority and our would bring in more. the commission could oversee the sale to overcome partisan opposition. >> the commission could look at all the federal assets, the side which were the most valuable with the least cost to common good. >> when william was reporting on the federal government gives resources away
a $5 delivery charge? that is what ebay is testing in san francisco right now. jeff abraham, director of local ebay marketplaces. you have done a lot in your short life can be done well with this technology and the company sold to ebay for a few million dollars but now you're pushing this delivery model. why do you think you can go up against the amazon and wal-mart of the world with this new model? >> i think there are a couple of really interesting things to think about with this model. consumers value the ease of use, convenience, time is a really big factor. people are busy these days. haven't bought all these gifts for family and friends, ebay is the perfect twill. you can have it delivered in typically under an hour, which is pretty incredible. we think it is a compelling proposition. cheryl: there has been some missteps in that communication and a $5 charge. i have to wonder how can ebay make money on this? is this some type of deal with the retailers will cut to make a profit here? >> right now it is really a focus on user experience and engagement. we want to make it posssble
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)